2.03.2009

Discuss

Hamline's new logo. Their take on it: "Designed to support Hamline’s brand identity, the logo conveys a sense of energy and excitement and better communicates Hamline’s identity as innovative and distinctive. The new logo uses a combination of serif and sans serif fonts, suggesting both history and innovation. “Hamline” is emphasized, with “University” secondary. The shape was drawn out from the interlocking “HU”—it is the space in the middle of where the two letters intersect. A modern take on a traditional academic symbol, the logo gives a sense of strength, boldness, celebration, and permanency."

As you know, I never have opinions or preferences. Your thoughts?

16 comments:

Erin, A Crafty Lass said...

I think overall it's pretty decent. My complaint, which is my regular complaint when it comes to University logos, is why they persist in using brick red, maroon, gold, or any variation on ketchup and mustard.

Burt C said...

Umm. No. I think it's terrible. Boring. This says extended stay hotel to me, not an institution of higher education.

Eric said...

It sure beats Concordia's "Hearts in Harmony" logo. I like it.

Meema said...

Not a fan of mixed fonts on corporate/institutional logos.

Tom said...

Agreed on mixed fonts and brick red. And the asymmetry of the shape behind the H is somehow unsettling when situated above the text. Finally, nothing can compare to the Three Crowns.

MK said...

It looks like a botched imitation of Hogwarts.
Next, they'll embroider all of our ketchup/mustard robes with it, and require the damn robes every damn day.

Stephanie said...

I was going to say that I don't like one single thing about it, but that would make me sound like a J. So:, I guess the word "University" isn't too bad.

Ann said...

The H thingy could look nice in the upper right corner of something, like a notecard, but can you imagine it centered across the breast of a co-ed's tee-shirt?

Not so much.

I do think the font choice (which I like) for "Hamline" fits well with the historic (Summit Ave.) part of St. Paul. Maybe they could move the University south a few blocks so that makes sense?

Ann said...

Ugh. I just checked the Hamline University website. They are running the logo words ("Hamline University") left to right, not one above the other. Ugh. The mixed fonts work even less well that way.

aflamingstar said...

I also am not a fan of the mixed fonts. The color is fine though.

the chef said...

The truncated shield is pandering and shite. The mixing of fonts is vulgar and shite. The color maroon is mostly unwearable and...shite.

Anonymous said...

meh.

from what I can tell, the previous identity was a non-mark. I bet I would have preferred some of the other ideas.

phil

Anonymous said...

A short tour of institutional logos:

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/05/MissStateUwordmark.png

I think this would have been the pinnacle for Hamline. It's the type of logo the HU designers were going for, with strong typography that honors the tradition of the school while still looking crisp, clean, and relevant. The bevel effect on the M-State banner provides depth and power.

PARK UNIVERSITY
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/18/Optimized_image_7aedb2ed.png

This is the other logo I immediately thought of when encountering a Hamline rebrand. Mississippi State's logo is the direction they went (just executed SO much better), but Park's is a logo in a direction they could have gone. Just imagine Old Main in there. Nice, huh? The "Park" typeface is Trajan, which is used way too much in academic logos. On the other hand, it's a classy typeface that has shown some staying power.

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON
http://www.washington.edu/home/graphics/uw_signature2009.gif

Many schools use stand alone wordmarks as institutional logos. Obviously, this is what Hamline had with its Garamond mark. If the designers were looking to express the type of tradition and progression you're going to find at Hamline, this is the kind of typeface to do it with.

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI-KANSAS CITY
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9f/UMKC_logo.png

How 'bout adding a little flair to that wordmark? UMKC is not as stately of an institution as Washington, and its mark communicates as much. It's a little more corporate, despite its use of Trajan Pro. The tails of the flame compliment the serifs on the wordmark, giving the logo a strong blend of straight and curved lines; that is the tradition/progression dichotomy Hamline was looking for.

UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO
http://home.uchicago.edu/~mporter/logo.jpg

This is a more traditional wordmark/seal approach, which is great for a place like Chicago. I wouldn't have been bothered by a move in this direction from Hamline, but I understand wanting to distinguish itself from Macalester and Carleton.

UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/1c/University_of_Iowa_logo.png

This is what I think Hamline's logo will look like in a few years: tired, out-of-fashion and without synthesis.

Anonymous said...

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/05/MissStateUwordmark.png

PARK UNIVERSITY
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/18/Optimized_image_7aedb2ed.png

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON
http://www.washington.edu/home/graphics/uw_signature2009.gif

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI-KANSAS CITY
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9f/UMKC_logo.png

UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/1c/University_of_Iowa_logo.png

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